World Development Movement blog | World Development Movement

Join us in the fight for economic justice and an end to global poverty.

World Development Movement blog

23 October 2014

Yesterday, at the last minute, University College London (UCL) cancelled an event about BHP Billiton in Colombia due to be held this evening. Why?

23 October 2014

You’re the government of a small South American country with a modest-sized health budget and you want to do what you can to encourage citizens to lead healthier, longer lives by dissuading them to give up smoking. Seeing the success that other countries have had with similar legislation (such as in the UK), you decide to increase the size of the health warnings on cigarette packets and clamp down on supposed ‘light’ brands. And then a huge tobacco multinational comes along and tries to sue you for millions for bringing in legislation that would harm their profits.

17 October 2014

As the European Commission concludes its consultation on biodiversity offsetting, almost 10,000 people and nearly 60 organisations (including us) have signed a letter urging the Commission not to pursue policy related to biodiversity offsetting (BO). They fear it would “harm nature and people, and give power to those who destroy nature for private profit.”

17 October 2014

Dutch journalist Caroline de Gruyter, writing for NRC Handelsblad reported that incoming European Commission president Jean Claude Juncker is said to have decided to remove the controversial investor-to-state dispute settlement (ISDS) from TTIP, citing that it is “too late” to win on the issue, and to send a clear signal to EU citizens that he has “heard them."

16 October 2014

All over the world small-scale food producers are growing food sustainably for their local communities in spite of the threats thrown at them by the world’s elite and powerful. 

13 October 2014

Last month, members of the World Development Movement from around the country voted to change our name to Global Justice Now.

Changing our name is just one step in a bigger ‘relaunch’. This isn’t about changing our values, but expressing them more effectively. About building a bigger movement and running more high profile campaigns which can really start to change the world.

13 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa: The Zai pit technique originated in Mali but was adopted and modified by farmers in Burkina Faso after a particularly bad drought in 1980 which affected over 1 million people.

13 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa. Yields.

13 October 2014

This week we hope to see climate change hit the news again. Not because of another catastrophic weather event but because activists from around the world are taking part in a week of action against the dirty energy companies and institutions that fuel climate change.

9 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa. Xeriscaping is a form of landscaping and gardening which emphasises water conservation and is therefore ideal for arid environments.

9 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa.  In many African countries, harvesting and storing rainwater is an important way of ensuring that food production can continue into parts of the dry season.

9 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa: Preserving the diversity of plant and animal varieties is of fundamental importance for the long-term sustainability of our food system.

8 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa. Uganda has over 180,000 organic farmers, the second highest number of producers in the world after India (340,000). 

8 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in African: The Tigray project is a sustainable development project that started in Tigray, northern Ethiopia in 1996.

7 October 2014

The latest in our A to Z of food sovereignty in Africa. Community Seeds Banks emerged about 30 years ago as a response to biological diversity loss,  increasing corporate control over  seeds and the impact of natural disasters and climate change on crop production.

Latest tweets