Food

Banner

Stop the corporate takeover of Africa’s food
Take action

Africa is producing more and more food. Why is hunger rising?

Huge corporations are scrambling to take control of Africa’s food at the expense of the small-scale farmers who feed most of the continent.

>>> Find out why

Small-scale farmers are fighting to win back control

Via the international movement for food sovereignty, small-scale farmers are fighting to keep control of their land and seeds, produce food sustainably and prioritise food for local populations over exports

>>> Find out how

Take action: Stop the Monsanto law

Ghana is passing a law because of pressure from rich governments and corporations

Justine Greening: stop listening to Coca-Cola

The International Development Secretary is helping Coca-Cola profit at the expense of Africa's small-scale farmers

Latest Posts

2014: International year of family farming


11 December 2014

Family farmers hold the key to global food security, but they need support to combat the agribusiness big boys.

The land is ours


10 December 2014

This week the Scottish Land Action Movement launched and added itself to a growing global movement of activists, small-scale farmers, landless workers, indigenous communities and many others all working to shift control of land from the hands of the few to the hands of the many.

Scaling up seed sovereignty


04 December 2014

At a time when seed corporations are pressuring African governments to pass new laws which will create legally-binding seed monopolies (as in Ghana), it is critical that our campaigning efforts are directed at stopping these ‘Monsanto laws’ as well as supporting the alternatives to them.

Latest news

Ninety NGOs and campaign groups have condemned the G7’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, as representatives of governments and multinational companies, including UK development secretary Justine Greening, meet in New York today to discuss the controversial scheme.

Global justice campaigners have called on Unilever to pull out of an aid scheme they say will damage African countries’ ability to tackle poverty.

Unilever, which holds its AGM in London on Wednesday 14 May, is a leading member of the G8’s ‘New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition’. The scheme claims it will lift 50 million people in Africa out of poverty by 2022. But the World Development Movement believes the New Alliance will increase hunger and poverty by taking land and power away from millions of small-scale farmers.

£600 million in UK aid money is going to a scheme to help big businesses increase their profits in Africa, a report by the World Development Movement reveals. The report slams the scheme as fuelling a ‘corporate scramble for Africa’.